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  • Convenient online courses delivered in a simple, user-friendly way via computer, tablet or mobile device.
  • Enrollment is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week.
  • Course fees include online access to all course materials and a certificate of completion.
  • Graduate credit provided through accredited Humboldt State University for an additional fee. (See "Graduate Credit" page for details)
  • Courses may be taken concurrently, and are activated immediately following registration.

Multi-course discounts available

To obtain your custom discount code, start a LiveChat on this page, give us a call at 1-888-388-9877 or visit our contact us page and send us a message.

2018-19 Professional Development Courses

The Passion-Driven Classroom
Course Fee: $160.00
Semester Credits: 2
Credit Fee: $100 through Humboldt State University
It is time to reassert and reinsert the “heart” back into teaching and learning. Our goal in The Passion-Driven Classroom course is to help you to do just that and to convince you that Passion-Driven Learning will move our students further and deeper into mastery of content and knowledge than ever imaginable, while helping them discover their own aspirations. Our classrooms will move away from prescription-driven to Passion-Driven Learning. Educational scholarship can be achieved only when we allow our hearts and heads to work in tandem rather than as opposing forces.

Course Reviews

"This course has helped me realize the need for more passion-driven classrooms because our students deserve to be cared about and happy at school, more engaged and excited about learning, and prepared for the future workforce...I had never really thought about an intangible passion variable being so important to learning."
-- M.T. from Florida


"What I will take away from this course is the learning club classroom. I plan on turning my intervention courses into math clubs with a more fun direction and making the class feel like a club-like atmosphere instead of a support class...The passion poem was what I loved the most. It was just perfect. I am going to hang that in my classroom and look at it often."
-- S.W. from Nevada

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The Passion-Driven Classroom
Course Outline

Course Fee: $160
Course Numbers: EED x701 47066, SED x701 47067
Standard Course Time: 30 hours
Semester Credits: Two (2) academic credits at the graduate level (available for an additional fee)
Credit Issued by: Humboldt State University (refer to our Graduate Credit page for credit pricing and details)
Subject Area: Special Topics

This course has been developed and optimized for online delivery using the licensed title The Passion-Driven Classroom, 2nd Edition, published by Routledge and authored by Angela Maiers and Amy Sandvold.

Introduction/Course Description:

As teachers, our role is challenging. In subtle and in not-so subtle ways, we are getting mixed messages. We are told to plan engaging lessons, make students behave, and increase test scores—or else. Many of us teach in schools that integrate technology and focus on more math and science initiatives. The worst case scenario are initiatives with strings attached: Make sure the test results show proficiency, or your funding for innovation disappears. Fidelity to the curriculum and preparation for the test have become the priority. We are coerced to remove love and emotion from our instruction because those things can’t be measured. We slowly and wearily set aside our own love for learning and our students, as well as passion for the profession. Our teaching has become a prescription as everything is decided for us—what to teach, when to teach it, and how to assess it. Students are tested on their performance and mastery of the content.

It is time to reassert and reinsert the “heart” back into teaching and learning. Our goal in The Passion-Driven Classroom course is to help you to do just that and to convince you that Passion-Driven Learning will move our students further and deeper into mastery of content and knowledge than ever imaginable, while helping them discover their own aspirations. Our classrooms will move away from prescription-driven to Passion-Driven Learning. Educational scholarship can be achieved only when we allow our hearts and heads to work in tandem rather than as opposing forces.

Course Objectives/Program Outline

Module One: Achievement Gap or Passion Gap

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn what it means to Listen to our Students.
  • Understand what is a “Passion Gap”.
  • Understand how to close the “Passion Gap” step by step.

Project 1: Putting Passion into Practice
Quiz: Multiple-choice questions that pertain to objectives above.

Module Two: Let's Talk About Passion

Learning Objectives:

  • Redefine and understand what Passion is.
  • Learn an acronym that summarizes the intrinsic nature of individuals driven by passion.
  • Understand that passion-driven learning is more than a project.
  • Discover what passion can do and its abundant benefits.

Project 2: Identify Your Biggest Passion
Quiz: Multiple-choice questions that pertain to objectives above.

Module Three: The Clubhouse Mindset - Where Passion Meets Practice

Learning Objectives:

  • Rediscover what a passion-driven learning club is and the philosophy behind it.
  • Learn what makes club life enticing.
  • Learn and understand what a Passion Discovery Continuum is.
  • Explore a workshop classroom driven by curiosity.
  • Redefine the role of the teacher as an expert learner and passion practitioner.
  • Redefine the role of the student as an apprentice learner and global citizen.
  • Learn how to create an Expert Wall

Quiz: Multiple-choice questions that pertain to objectives above.

Module Four: A Passion-Driven Classroom

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the difference between learning clubs and classroom jobs.
  • Learn the importance of “You Matter Time”.
  • Expand their learning of the importance of reflection.
  • Learn the value of a task board.
  • Learn to utilize good-fit tools and technology.
  • Understand the power of “Celebration”

Project 3: Transitioning to Learning Clubs
Quiz: Multiple-choice questions that pertain to objectives above.

Module Five: Organizing the Passion-Driven Classroom

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn how to create a passion-driven classroom’s physical environment.
  • Learn passion-driven tools to add to the environment and enrich the learning experience.
  • Learn the importance of a routine sequence.
  • Learn and understand how simple changes equal BIG impacts.

Project 4: Creating Your Own Thinkbook
Quiz: Multiple-choice questions that pertain to objectives above.

Module Six: Phase 1 - Managing the Clubhouse Classroom

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn how to launch learning through opening message anchor lessons.
  • Learn the process of shifting our lessons away from routines to metacognition (thinking about one’s own thinking).

Quiz: Multiple-choice questions that pertain to objectives above.

Module Seven: Phase 2 and 3 - Managing the Clubhouse Classroom

Learning Objectives:

  • Explore the value of students recognizing their own thinking through learning clubs.
  • Understand the value and importance of sharing individual’s gifts.
  • Profoundly understand that passion still matters for global educators.
  • Understand the value of choosing passion in times of change.

Quiz: Multiple-choice questions that pertain to objectives above.

Final Exam

Multiple choice questions taken from each module

Final Learning Statement

Learning statements should be in a narrative format – as opposed to an outline format. Depending on individual writing styles Learning statements should be 2-3 pages. The learning statement can vary according to individual style. Your learning statement should answer the broad question of "what did you learn?". To help get you thinking, here are some suggested questions:

  • What are the major concepts of the course that you have learned?
  • What new professional language have you acquired relating to the topic?
  • What teaching techniques for implementing new strategies in the classroom did you come away with?
  • Thinking back to your project reflections, were you surprised at the outcomes?
  • What new resources did you find in the study of the content?
  • As an educator, what new concepts will you now integrate into your teaching?
  • Are there any ideas that presented themselves as enlightening and useful?

--- Sample Course Project ---

Project #1 Overview

In this module, we have learned how to listen to our students and understand the need for creating a culture of passion as well as keeping it alive.

For this project, answer these question:
  • How can we, as educators, stand in front of learners and tell them to pursue their passion, to write what they know and care about, and use their gifts to change the world...if we are not willing to do the same?
  • Are we worthy of such a role in our students’ and our own children’s lives if we have not done everything possible to stand up for what we believe in, defend it publicly, and move forward with causes that matter most?
  • Do we as leaders and learners have what it takes to pursue our passion all the way? Do we have the ambition, the instinct, self-motivation, and the drive to put passion into practice?

For Your Written Project Reflection Submission

Take a moment to reflect on your findings for this project, using the questions below as a guide:

  • What is your biggest "aHa" about yourself as an educator and life-long learner?
  • Are you passionate about being an educator? Life? Learning?

Visit the "Module Projects" section located within the Course Dashboard, and take a moment to share your findings by submitting your written project reflection.


Humboldt State University Credit Specifics

  • Academic Credit at the Graduate Level through Humboldt State University (HSU) is offered after successful completion of this course.
  • The 700 series semester credit is post-baccalaureate level appropriate for credentialed teachers which do not require admission to a graduate program.
  • 700-level classes are graduate level classes meant specifically for credential purposes, and are appropriate for license renewal or recertification.
  • Courses are letter graded on official transcripts from HSU.
  • HSU is the northernmost and westernmost institution in the 23-campus California State University (CSU) system.
  • HSU is accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges Senior College and University Commission (WSCUC), a regional accrediting agency serving a diverse membership of public and private higher education institutions.

Summer Option

If you are not currently teaching (ie. Summer break, you are a substitute teacher, etc.), each class offers you the ability to complete coursework independent of a classroom assignment.

Assessing Specific Learning Difficulties
Course Fee: $160.00
Semester Credits: 2
Credit Fee: $100 through Humboldt State University
In this course we have decided to use the term ‘specific learning difficulties’. This is a broad term and we have deliberately gone for this as it incorporates literacy, movement and numeracy as well as issues with attention. These areas are reflected in different sections in the course. We hope you will obtain some fresh insights and be able to embrace the ideas and strategies within the modules of this course. We have always indicated that communication is the key to successful assessment and intervention and we hope that this course paves a way for us to communicate with you to assist in the development of ideas and strategies that you can utilize in your professional work.

Course Reviews

"Of all the courses I have taken in the past five to six years, this course was the most enlightening.  There was so much information presented that I will need to revisit my notes in a few weeks to continue my reflection on this course.  The idea of working towards a less disruptive classroom to help improve teaching and learning, although fairly obvious, is easy to overlook."
-- J.C. from Ohio


"I am very happy with taking this course. After being in the classroom for four years, I was able to really learn and reflect throughout taking this course. I have a difficult group of students this upcoming year, both academically and behaviorally, and I feel that I have learned a lot to help me with my new students. This course will not only help me understand my students better, but it will also help me know how to take action with helping these kids in the most productive and successful way."
-- A.K. from Missouri


"I found the course Assessing Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLD’s) to cover a broad knowledge base from definitions of specific learning difficulties to assessments and checklists to use to identify and diagnose learning difficulties to steps to implement interventions for students. Literacy is broken down and self-esteem is explored in its relation to learning needs. Throughout the course, I discovered new information and was reminded of aspects of teaching that are important to allow students with specific learning difficulties reach their academic potential."
-- D.H. from Thailand

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Assessing Specific Learning Difficulties
Course Outline

Course Fee: $160
Course Numbers: EED x701 46951, SED x701 46953
Standard Course Time: 30 hours
Semester Credits: Two (2) academic credit at the graduate level (available for an additional fee)
Credit Issued by: Humboldt State University (refer to our Graduate Credit page for credit pricing and details)
Subject Area: Special Needs

This course has been developed and optimized for online delivery using the licensed title Assessing Children with Specific Learning Difficulties, published by Routledge and authored by Gavin Reid, Gad Elbeheri and John Everatt.

Introduction/Course Description:

In this course we have decided to use the term ‘specific learning difficulties’. This is a broad term and we have deliberately gone for this as it incorporates literacy, movement and numeracy as well as issues with attention. These areas are reflected in different sections in the course.

We hope you will obtain some fresh insights and be able to embrace the ideas and strategies within the modules of this course. We have always indicated that communication is the key to successful assessment and intervention and we hope that this course paves a way for us to communicate with you to assist in the development of ideas and strategies that you can utilize in your professional work.

Course Objectives/Program Outline

Module One: SpLD in Context

Learning Objectives:

  • Define three specific learning difficulties and what identifiers to look for in learners.
  • Recognize attention deficit disorders and their symptoms.
  • Identify learning barriers and there connection to the learner.
  • Support the link of assessment and intervention.
  • Assess key aspects of differentiation in assessment.

Project 1: Assessment and Intervention - Creative Problem Solving
Quiz: Multiple-choice questions that pertain to objectives above.

Module Two: The Assessment Process

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the process of assessment and its importance.
  • Differentiate between diagnostic and informal assessments.
  • Demonstrate different ways to assess the metacognitive strategies of the learner.
  • Evaluate three main components of information processing.

Quiz: Multiple-choice questions that pertain to objectives above.

Module Three: Teacher Assessment - Literacy and Movement

Learning Objectives:

  • Name the importance of assessment in literacy.
  • Examine the literary assessment process and its factors.
  • Describe the importance and role of curriculum-based assessment.
  • Illustrate literacy difficulties and how to guide students to be owners of their own learning process.
  • Summarize the importance of motor skills in the learning process.
  • Recite the connection between literacy and motor skills.
  • Support the importance of early intervention and tips for classroom teachers.

Project 2: The Connection of Literacy and Movement
Quiz: Multiple-choice questions that pertain to objectives above.

Module Four: Numeracy - Mathematics Learning Difficulties

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify the features and define mathematical related learning disabilities.
  • Interpret the process of mathematic assessment.
  • Expand after assessment what intervention needs to be planned and implemented.

Quiz: Multiple-choice questions that pertain to objectives above.

Module Five: Behavioral Problems

Learning Objectives:

  • Correlate the relationship between learning and behavioral problems.
  • Define emotional behavior disorders.
  • Validate the connection of learning difficulties and attention deficits. (ADHD)
  • Demonstrate the process of behavioral, emotional and social assessment.
  • Explain after assessment what intervention needs to be planned and implemented.
  • Verify the difficulties of labeling.

Project 3: Which Came First...the Chicken or the Egg?
Quiz: Multiple-choice questions that pertain to objectives above.

Module Six: Self-Esteem, Motivation and Emotional Needs

Learning Objectives:

  • Determine the importance of self-esteem and self-perception for the learner.
  • Differentiate the connection of self-esteem and self-perception in motivation and achievement.
  • Represent how to plan and deal with learning barriers.
  • Illustrate how to match a learner to their zone of proximal development.
  • Evaluate the connection between intervention, affect and motivation when working with children who experience learning difficulties.

Project 4: Self-Esteem Infusion
Quiz: Multiple-choice questions that pertain to objectives above.

Module Seven: Developing an Assessment Framework

Learning Objectives:

  • Apply how to link their assessments to practice.
  • Recognize the learning process and what they can do to support the learner.
  • State key points in developing a framework for assessment.
  • Integrate the value of assessing processing skills.
  • Validate the problem to solution approach.
  • Outline the areas that need to be considered throughout the assessment process.

Quiz: Multiple-choice questions that pertain to objectives above.

Final Exam

Multiple choice questions taken from each module

Final Learning Statement

Learning statements should be in a narrative format – as opposed to an outline format. Depending on individual writing styles Learning statements should be 2-3 pages. The learning statement can vary according to individual style. Your learning statement should answer the broad question of "what did you learn?". To help get you thinking, here are some suggested questions:

  • What are the major concepts of the course that you have learned?
  • What new professional language have you acquired relating to the topic?
  • What teaching techniques for implementing new strategies in the classroom did you come away with?
  • Thinking back to your project reflections, were you surprised at the outcomes?
  • What new resources did you find in the study of the content?
  • As an educator, what new concepts will you now integrate into your teaching?
  • Are there any ideas that presented themselves as enlightening and useful?

--- Sample Course Project ---

Project #1 Overview

Learning Objective: Identify a student or person showing signs of SpLds and choose a proactive assessment and intervention for this individual.

In this module, you've become familiar with types of SpLDs, their indicator and barriers to learning. As we shared, it is essential to consider the link to assessment and intervention at the outset. It should not be an add-on but, in fact, one of the main purposes of the assessment.

For this Project:
  • Think of a student or person who came to mind while working through the first module of this course.
  • Write a descriptive narrative about how this student presents in class academically, socially and emotionally through your observations.
  • Write what indicators are present and what your concerns are and address if co-morbidity is present.
  • Take a moment to identify any specific barriers to learning.

For Your Written Project Reflection Submission

Take a moment to reflect on your findings for this project, using the questions below as a guide:

  • What is the purpose of your chosen proactive assessment?
  • As part of your plan, how will you effectively differentiate for this student/person? Be specific.
  • What is the most advantageous learning style for this student/person? How will you choose to communicate this with the student/person?
  • Share any elements of creativity that you plan to incorporate in your assessment and intervention strategy.

Visit the "Module Projects" section located within the Course Dashboard, and take a moment to share your findings by submitting your written project reflection.


Humboldt State University Credit Specifics

  • Academic Credit at the Graduate Level through Humboldt State University (HSU) is offered after successful completion of this course.
  • The 700 series semester credit is post-baccalaureate level appropriate for credentialed teachers which do not require admission to a graduate program.
  • 700-level classes are graduate level classes meant specifically for credential purposes, and are appropriate for license renewal or recertification.
  • Courses are letter graded on official transcripts from HSU.
  • HSU is the northernmost and westernmost institution in the 23-campus California State University (CSU) system.
  • HSU is accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges Senior College and University Commission (WSCUC), a regional accrediting agency serving a diverse membership of public and private higher education institutions.

Summer Option

If you are not currently teaching (ie. Summer break, you are a substitute teacher, etc.), each class offers you the ability to complete coursework independent of a classroom assignment.

Learning on Your Feet
Course Fee: $80.00
Semester Credits: 1
Credit Fee: $50 through Humboldt State University
What makes this course stand out from other classroom strategy courses is the inclusion of more physical fitness, which research shows dramatically improves students’ focus, behavior, and achievement. But understand that the research and activities aren’t just an extension of physical education class. Rather, they focus on developing core, balance, and fitness, which improve reading, critical thinking, organization, focus, behavior, and overall academic achievement. The research in this course overwhelmingly reinforces our position that a fit body is critical to maximum student achievement and overall success. What is interesting is that many academic issues with reading or math are actually often related to physical issues. For example, as we will discuss in the course, poor reading skills may in some part be attributed to lack of coordination (body midline), which impedes the ability to read from left to right. If the ideas and strategies in this course are implemented into the traditional classroom, you will see a significant change in your students’ behavior, productivity, sense of well-being, and achievement.

Course Reviews

"Overall, this course made me more aware; more aware of what I’m doing each day in the classroom to optimize my students’ overall experience and also more aware of how I parent and what I want for my own children as they get older.  It was certainly a worthwhile use of my time.  Thank you!"
-- L.C. from Massachusetts


"This was such a fun class to take! I didn’t really know what to expect, in fact, I sort of expected it to tell me to get up more during teaching and circulate in the room more, but it’s just the opposite – the students need to get up more!!  It has given me so much to think about and so many important reminders of what I should be incorporating in my classroom each day."
-- L.W. from Nevada


"This course was very beneficial to me for learning different types and styles of movement activities. I am so excited to try one of them in particular out which is the stationary bike used to read. I have ridden my bike 13 miles a day to work for the past 8 years and I think the movement keeps me not stressed. And that is exactly what I learned in this class is the power of play and exercise."
-- J.K. from Japan


"Although I was aware of the importance of movement I learned through this course the vital connection that exists between learning and movement. I am excited about witnessing the differences brain breaks, using nature as an extension of the classroom and adding more kinesthetic and tactile activity in the classroom will make."
-- S.S. from Ohio

Print or Share Outline

Learning on Your Feet
Course Outline

Course Fee: $80
Course Numbers: EED x701 46952, SED x701 46954
Standard Course Time: 15 hours
Semester Credits: One (1) academic credit at the graduate level (available for an additional fee)
Credit Issued by: Humboldt State University (refer to our Graduate Credit page for credit pricing and details)
Subject Area: Special Topics

This course has been developed and optimized for online delivery using the licensed title Learning on Your Feet, published by Routledge and authored by Brad Johnson and Melody Jones.

Introduction/Course Description:

What makes this course stand out from other classroom strategy courses is the inclusion of more physical fitness, which research shows dramatically improves students’ focus, behavior, and achievement. But understand that the research and activities aren’t just an extension of physical education class. Rather, they focus on developing core, balance, and fitness, which improve reading, critical thinking, organization, focus, behavior, and overall academic achievement. The research in this course overwhelmingly reinforces our position that a fit body is critical to maximum student achievement and overall success. What is interesting is that many academic issues with reading or math are actually often related to physical issues. For example, as we will discuss in the course, poor reading skills may in some part be attributed to lack of coordination (body midline), which impedes the ability to read from left to right.

If the ideas and strategies in this course are implemented into the traditional classroom, you will see a significant change in your students’ behavior, productivity, sense of well-being, and achievement. Students’ achievement can increase dramatically as their overall fitness improves. Teachers have also greatly benefited from the exercises discussed in this course, with weight loss, improved core strength, balance, and increased sense of well-being. Every module has great ideas to try, so feel free to implement as few or as many as you feel comfortable including in your classroom.


Course Objectives/Program Outline

Module One: Why Do Students Need to Get Moving?

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the important connection between learning and exercise.
  • Outline how physical activity improves brains elasticity, how contact with the outdoors has a calming effect, how exercise releases endorphins, and how the same part of the brain processes learning and movement.
  • Verify the connection of activity and test scores.

Project 1: The Need for Movement
Quiz: Multiple-choice questions that pertain to objectives above.

Module Two: Preparing to incorporate Movement in the Classroom

Learning Objectives:

  • Recognize the need to transform the traditional classroom.
  • Define various transformative ideas for their classroom.
  • Integrate technology and movement.
  • Document the integration of technology and movement with fresh eyes.
  • Evaluate various ways to integrate technology and movement.
  • Reconstruct how to create a classroom culture that children learn through active learning.
  • Support the concept of keeping it simple in your classroom.
  • Demonstrate effective movement strategies to manage their classroom.

Project 2: Home Improvement for the Traditional Classroom
Quiz: Multiple-choice questions that pertain to objectives above.

Module Three: Ways to Incorporate Movement into the Classroom

Learning Objectives:

  • Examine the stresses of today’s youth.
  • Develop various strategies to minimize stress in their classroom.
  • Recognize the link of classrooms of yesterday with the needs of classrooms today.
  • Demonstrate various strategies to engage learner’s minds and bodies.
  • Describe the invaluable importance of teamwork.
  • Reconstruct the various games that grow teamwork.
  • Analyze the importance of how information is taught in today’s classroom.
  • Support various activities that enhance STEM instruction.

Quiz: Multiple-choice questions that pertain to objectives above.

Module Four: Physical Fitness, Music and Movement

Learning Objectives:

  • Explain the connection of a strong core to a strong mind.
  • Demonstrate various activities to develop a strong core.
  • Verify the connection of balance and mental processing.
  • Apply various activities to improve balance.
  • Identify the importance of learning through play.
  • Discover various playful games that enhance a child’s ability to learn.
  • Validate the importance of music in the classroom.
  • Justify various musical activities and strategies that enhance a child’s ability to learn.

Project 3: And Then There Was Music…
Quiz: Multiple-choice questions that pertain to objectives above.

Final Exam

Multiple choice questions taken from each module

Final Learning Statement

Learning statements should be in a narrative format – as opposed to an outline format. Depending on individual writing styles Learning statements should be 2-3 pages. The learning statement can vary according to individual style. Your learning statement should answer the broad question of "what did you learn?". To help get you thinking, here are some suggested questions:

  • What are the major concepts of the course that you have learned?
  • What new professional language have you acquired relating to the topic?
  • What teaching techniques for implementing new strategies in the classroom did you come away with?
  • Thinking back to your project reflections, were you surprised at the outcomes?
  • What new resources did you find in the study of the content?
  • As an educator, what new concepts will you now integrate into your teaching?
  • Are there any ideas that presented themselves as enlightening and useful?

--- Sample Course Project ---

Learning Objective: Identify ways to incorporate movement activities into your classroom.

In this first module, we have learned about the about the important connection between learning and exercise. Regular physical activity supports healthy child development by improving memory, concentration, and positive outlook. The connection between learning and exercise seems to be especially strong for elementary school students. Given these findings, cutting back on physical education, recess, and even play with the aim of improving academic performance, as some districts have done, appears to be counterproductive. With your new understanding of exercise and its connection to learning, this project will focus on identifying the need for movement and the incorporation of movement activities into your classroom.

For this Project:
  • Think back to your overall school experience with an emphasis on the "past generation’s" general physical activity level at school. Write down specific examples of ways that movement was incorporated into the classroom and/or the school day.
  • Compare the "present generation’s" general physical activity level at school with that of the "past generation". Any similarities of differences?
  • Armed with both past and present examples, identify ways that the "future generation's" general physical activity level at school can be improved.

For Your Written Project Reflection Submission

Take a moment to reflect on your findings for this project, using the questions below as a guide:

  • What is one movement activity you will adopt in your classroom today?
  • Why is this movement activity important for your current class?
  • What will this movement develop in your students? Please be specific.

Visit the "Module Projects" section located within the Course Dashboard, and take a moment to share your findings by submitting your written project reflection.


Humboldt State University Credit Specifics

  • Academic Credit at the Graduate Level through Humboldt State University (HSU) is offered after successful completion of this course.
  • The 700 series semester credit is post-baccalaureate level appropriate for credentialed teachers which do not require admission to a graduate program.
  • 700-level classes are graduate level classes meant specifically for credential purposes, and are appropriate for license renewal or recertification.
  • Courses are letter graded on official transcripts from HSU.
  • HSU is the northernmost and westernmost institution in the 23-campus California State University (CSU) system.
  • HSU is accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges Senior College and University Commission (WSCUC), a regional accrediting agency serving a diverse membership of public and private higher education institutions.

Summer Option

If you are not currently teaching (ie. Summer break, you are a substitute teacher, etc.), each class offers you the ability to complete coursework independent of a classroom assignment.

Dealing with Difficult Parents
Course Fee: $160.00
Semester Credits: 2
Credit Fee: $100 through Humboldt State University
This course will help teachers, principals, superintendents and all educators increase their skills in working with the most challenging parents you come in contact with. Additionally, educators can learn and develop specific strategies to help deliver less than positive news in an appropriate manner to all of our constituents. We will also provide tools that can help you build credibility with all parents. This can increase the level of trust and support that is imperative in building the needed parent–school relationship, which will allow greater success for all students. Initiating positive contact with parents is essential in this process. For all educators, if we do not initiate positive contact with parents, then the only contact we may have is negative. When we get into this pattern, then we become very hesitant to inform or even interact with the adults in our students' lives. Being able to comfortably and effectively make educator-initiated contact with parents is a skill that all of us must learn and practice.Many of the situations we face are challenging. This course will provide you with specific language, understanding, and resources that you can immediately use in interacting with every parent in your community.

Course Reviews

"This course was definitely eye-opening to me as a teacher. I have found the information extremely valuable and enlightening. While I wish I had learned these strategies at the very beginning of my career, I am excited to continue seeing the outcomes of using these strategies in my classroom."
-- E.P. from New Jersey


"This class made me realize that parents act a certain way because of current situations or their past experiences. In order for us as educators to understand where our students are coming from, it is important for us to understand their parents' situations. Households have changed dramatically over the last several years and there are many more single-parent homes and homeless children. Many parents are doing their best, the best they know how. It is our job as educators to help them realize the importance of helping their children receive the best education that they can receive. All parents want what is best for their children, they just don't know how to get it. It is our job to help them realize how they can help."
-- H.M. from Oregon


"This course made me reflect on my teaching and the relationships that I have with students and their parents. It gave me some great tools and techniques to try with parents and ideas on how I can build better relationships and involve parents more in their child’s education. One of the hardest things for me is dealing with parents in difficult situations. This course really made me reflect and think about how it might feel to be on the other side of a situation."
-- T.J. from California


"There is a great deal to learn in this course. In reading through the modules and some of the case examples of situations and conversations with parents, it made me remember many of the dealings that I have encountered through the years. It reinforced my experiences and how I dealt with past situations and also made me look at how I could have handled a few cases different. Overall, this course has been a great learning experience for me."
-- W.O. from Ohio

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Dealing with Difficult Parents
Course Outline

Course Fee: $160
Course Numbers: EED x701 46773, SED x701 46782
Standard Course Time: 30 hours
Semester Credits: Two (2) academic credits at the graduate level (available for an additional fee)
Credit Issued by: Humboldt State University (refer to our Graduate Credit page for credit pricing and details)
Subject Area: Special Topics
Authors: Todd Whitaker, Ph.D. and Douglas J. Fiore Ph.D.

Introduction/Course Description:

One of the most challenging and potentially unnerving tasks that we as educators deal with on a regular basis is interacting with parents. This may not be true of all parents, or maybe even most parents, but there is always that parent who is a special challenge. The parent who is bossy, volatile, argumentative, aggressive, or maybe the worst—apathetic—can even make us question our abilities and ourselves. As educators, we are often taken aback the first time we deal with a hostile parent. We might be uncomfortable, intimidated, or just caught off guard. However, if we do not figure out effective and appropriate ways to interact with these parents, we may become apprehensive about communicating with other parents. Eventually, this may lead to a general discomfort or fear any time we have contact with parents.

Being able to successfully interact in these situations is essential. Developing phrases to use, being able to control the dialogue, and being sensitive to trigger words to avoid are skills that are learned through experience. However, it is valuable to have specific language that is appropriate for multiple situations that allows us to accomplish our needs—and hopefully even allows us to develop a more positive relationship with these parents for the future.

Another tough situation that all educators face is delivering bad news to good parents. Being able to do this effectively and in an appropriate manner is critical to developing needed support from parents. This is true whether telling parents about a discipline situation, recommending placement in a special needs program, or informing them about a child's struggles with grades. Establishing and expanding a repertoire of tools is a critical need for everyone in education.

This course will help teachers, principals, superintendents and all educators increase their skills in working with the most challenging parents you come in contact with. Additionally, educators can learn and develop specific strategies to help deliver less than positive news in an appropriate manner to all of our constituents. We will also provide tools that can help you build credibility with all parents. This can increase the level of trust and support that is imperative in building the needed parent–school relationship, which will allow greater success for all students. Initiating positive contact with parents is essential in this process. For all educators, if we do not initiate positive contact with parents, then the only contact we may have is negative. When we get into this pattern, then we become very hesitant to inform or even interact with the adults in our students' lives. Being able to comfortably and effectively make educator-initiated contact with parents is a skill that all of us must learn and practice.

Many of the situations we face are challenging. This course will provide you with specific language, understanding, and resources that you can immediately use in interacting with every parent in your community.

Course Objectives/Program Outline

This course is broken into major parts called modules. Each module contains content sections. Within each section, we cover one or more of the outlined learning objectives for the module. At the end of each module, there is a quiz. Some modules include a project. The breakdown for modules within this course is as follows:

Module One : An Overview

Learning Objectives:

  • Explore the term "parent" and define its meaning when used throughout this course.
  • Understand that parents are doing the best they know how, and our positive outlook as teachers can be productive when dealing with them.
  • Determine whether you argue or speak sarcastically to difficult parents.

Quiz: Multiple-choice questions that pertain to objectives above.

Module Two : Today's Parents

Learning Objectives:

  • Explore family configurations of previous generations and identify ways that the current generation of parents differ.
  • Identify how modern day family configurations and wealth contribute to family stress.
  • Develop an understanding of the most typical behaviors of difficult parents.
  • Examine the relationship between a parents perception of school and the message that many in the current media are delivering.
  • Define the differences between the child-centered household and the adult-centered household.
  • Illustrate how past negative experiences and culture can shape attitudes toward our schools.

Project 1: Difficult Students and Difficult Parents
Project 2: Child-Centered Families versus Adult-Centered Families
Quiz: Multiple-choice questions that pertain to objectives above.

Module Three : Communicating with Parents

Learning Objectives:

  • Illustrate how developing trust can create a positive first impression.
  • Introduce elements of positive contact that can result in productive parent relationships.
  • Explore methods of positive communication with parents.
  • Identify the five elements of effective praise.
  • Develop a consistent method for positive contact with parents.
  • Define the importance of healthy relationships and their influence in the creation of positive school-home relationships.
  • Illustrate the importance of positive methods for greeting parents and visitors.
  • Develop an understanding of the comfort zones of parents versus your own.

Project 3: Positivity Protocol
Project 4: Social Media Tools
Quiz: Multiple-choice questions that pertain to objectives above.

Module Four : Soothing the Savage Beast

Learning Objectives:

  • Recognize the appropriate time to use either an email or phone call to start a conversation.
  • Outline various techniques that you can use to diffuse difficult situations.
  • Explore situations where the parent is right and describe ways to help resolve the issue.
  • Introduce the phrase "I am sorry that happened" and its ability to satisfy even the most aggressive parents.
  • Discover that being in touch with our feelings can help us to correct things before we put ourselves in the position of having to defend our actions.

Project 5: Admitting Your Mistakes
Quiz: Multiple-choice questions that pertain to objectives above.

Module Five: Dealing with Parents in Difficult Situations

Learning Objectives:

  • Analyze difficult situations and provide the tools necessary for generating positive outcomes.
  • Idenitfy various approaches to delivering bad news to a parent.
  • Explore the basic concept of treating others fairly and with respect, and the result of "getting a good deal".
  • Integrate the methods of effective salesman when dealing with difficult classroom situations.
  • Introduce the "F" word - Fair, and develop an effective approach to working in fairness with students and parents.
  • Demonstrate that having a focus on the future can provide a point of view that student, parent and teacher can agree on.

Project 6: Giving a Good Deal
Quiz: Multiple-choice questions that pertain to objectives above.

Module Six : Increasing Parental Involvement

Learning Objectives:

  • Examine the importance of parental involvement in promoting the social, emotional and academic growth of children.
  • Identify various programs that can increase parental involvement within your school.
  • Recognize and learn to work through many of the obstacles to involving parents at school.
  • Illustrate the importance of communication in parental involvement.
  • Discuss ways parents can support school from home.

Project 7: Parent Involvement Plan
Quiz: Multiple-choice questions that pertain to objectives above.

Final Exam

Multiple choice questions taken from each module

Final Learning Statement

Learning statements should be in a narrative format – as opposed to an outline format. Depending on individual writing styles Learning statements should be 2-3 pages. The learning statement can vary according to individual style. Your learning statement should answer the broad question of "what did you learn?". To help get you thinking, here are some suggested questions:

  • What are the major concepts of the course that you have learned?
  • What new professional language have you acquired relating to the topic?
  • What teaching techniques for implementing new strategies in the classroom did you come away with?
  • Thinking back to your project reflections, were you surprised at the outcomes?
  • What new resources did you find in the study of the content?
  • As an educator, what new concepts will you now integrate into your teaching?
  • Are there any ideas that presented themselves as enlightening and useful?

--- Sample Course Project ---

Difficult Students and Difficult Parents - Project #1 Overview

The authors of this course state that if you have any students that you just cannot tolerate any more, you feel like your patience bucket has run out, you can barely stand the thought of them walking into your classrooms tomorrow, there is one thing that you can do. There is one simple thing you can do that will give you a whole new perspective on that child. That is...

Meet their parents.

This simple strategy can help you stay positive about your most difficult students as the school year unfolds.

For this project, think about your current population of students, particularly those who give you the most challenges. In addition, think about the most difficult parents. Then take a moment to:

  • Make a list of your five most difficult parents.
  • Make a list of your five most difficult students.

Now that you have made your lists, move on to the project submission as stated below.

For Your Project Reflection Submission

Take a moment to reflect on your findings for this project, using the following questions as a guide:

  • Do you see any similarities between student/parent in this list?
  • Of the parents you have met, whether in passing or formal, has meeting them helped you better understand their child?
  • Typically meeting their parents relieves your stress about the child themselves. Do you feel that there is some universal truth to what the authors say on this topic?

Visit the "Module Projects" section located within the Course Dashboard, and take a moment to share your findings by submitting your project reflection.


Humboldt State University Credit Specifics

  • Academic Credit at the Graduate Level through Humboldt State University (HSU) is offered after successful completion of this course.
  • The 700 series semester credit is post-baccalaureate level appropriate for credentialed teachers which do not require admission to a graduate program.
  • 700-level classes are graduate level classes meant specifically for credential purposes, and are appropriate for license renewal or recertification.
  • Courses are letter graded on official transcripts from HSU.
  • HSU is the northernmost and westernmost institution in the 23-campus California State University (CSU) system.
  • HSU is accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges Senior College and University Commission (WSCUC), a regional accrediting agency serving a diverse membership of public and private higher education institutions.

Summer Option

If you are not currently teaching (ie. Summer break, you are a substitute teacher, etc.), each class offers you the ability to complete coursework independent of a classroom assignment.

Seven Simple Secrets for Teachers
Course Fee: $80.00
Semester Credits: 1
Credit Fee: $50 through Humboldt State University
Want to know a secret? The absolute best teachers are not the absolute best because they were born the absolute best. They’re not the absolute best because they have the highest IQs. They were not the absolute best when they first started teaching. So why are they the absolute best? They’re the absolute best because they share something in common—seven simple secrets. That’s right—seven simple secrets that can and will change your life as a classroom teacher.

Course Reviews

"The seven simple secrets for teachers course was awesome. I think that as teachers who are experienced we often think we are "Know it alls". It was great to revisit topics we might not put much thought into like we did our first few years of teaching. This course was great and I look forward to taking another course through graduatecreditcourses.com!"
-- C.C. from Minnesota


"The Seven Simple Secrets for Teachers class has provided me something that I have been looking for but have not been able to find for many years, how to get out of survival mode and become an effective teacher. Now I have a roadmap to help me become an effective teacher, learn and apply the seven secrets: planning, classroom management, instruction, attitude, professionalism, effective discipline, motivation and inspiration."
-- M.W. from Iowa


"...I really enjoyed this course and I would like to recommend that anyone looking for professional development come to your site. This was a very beneficial class and I intend to take more classes from your site in the future."
-- A.M. from Missouri


"Classroom management is something that I and almost every teacher has struggled with. When I first started teaching I thought it was important to have lots of rules - created by students under my guidance. I taught in a private school and there were few, if any, student discipline problems. After a few years I moved to our city school district and found out no matter how many rules I had, I had a lot of students who chose not to follow them - and I was getting very frustrated. I finally talked with teachers who had hardly any problems and I realized that they had great relationships with their students and had few rules. I didn't know then, but what I was looking for was the difference between rules and procedures. It seems so simple but it really works. I took several classes and attended workshops on positive discipline, love and logic in the classroom, and read lots of books. I wish I had taken this course!!! I realize how important relationships are, but this course really makes me rethink even some of the things I do today in my classroom. "
-- C.P. from Ohio

Print or Share Outline

Seven Simple Secrets for Teachers
Course Outline

Course Fee: $80
Course Numbers: EED x701 46781, SED x701 46790
Standard Course Time: 15 Hours
Semester Credits: One (1) academic credit at the graduate level (available for an additional fee)
Credit Issued by: Humboldt State University (refer to our Graduate Credit page for credit pricing and details)
Subject Area: Special Topics
Authors: Annette L. Breaux, Todd Whitaker, Ph.D.,

Introduction/Course Description:

Want to know a secret? The absolute best teachers are not the absolute best because they were born the absolute best. They're not the absolute best because they have the highest IQs. They were not the absolute best when they first started teaching. So why are they the absolute best? They're the absolute best because they share something in common—seven simple secrets. That's right—seven simple secrets that can and will change your life as a classroom teacher.

Course Objectives/Program Outline

This course is broken into major parts called modules. Each module contains up to seven sections. Within each section, we cover one or more of the outlined learning objectives for the module. At the end of each module, there is a quiz. All modules include a project. The breakdown for modules within this course is as follows:

Module One-The Secret of Planning

Learning Objectives:

  • Define key parts to planning a lesson.
  • Describe the benefit of over planning your lessons.
  • Review strategies for managing your lesson plans in small increments of time.
  • Demonstrate the importance of flexibility in teaching.
  • Evaluate the importance of developing clear objectives for each lesson plan.
  • Apply strategies for promoting student activity in learning.
  • Differentiate between being proactive and reactive in teaching.

Project 1: The Secret of Planning - Checklist
Quiz: Multiple-choice questions that pertain to objectives above.

Module Two-The Secret of Classroom Management

Learning Objectives:

  • Build key aspects of an effective teacher's classroom.
  • Identify the difference between rules and procedures.
  • Create rules and procedures for classroom management.
  • Name ways to provide reminders and practice for classroom procedures.
  • State the strategy of teaching bell to bell.
  • Evaluate strategies for dealing with discipline challenges in a proactive manner.
  • Create alternatives to raising your voice in frustration.

Project 2: The Secret of Classroom Management - Checklist
Quiz: Multiple-choice questions that pertain to objectives above.

Module Three-The Secret of Instruction

Learning Objectives:

  • Apply main concepts of your lesson to student's current life to increase engagement.
  • Describe the importance of intentional student involvement in a learning environment.
  • Analyze the importance of teaching to each child's individual level.
  • Create three or more strategies to incorporate technology into classroom.
  • Align lessons to test what and how you teach your students.
  • Define key aspects of setting the pace of your lessons.
  • Create lessons to be able to teach anything to anyone.

Project 3: The Secret of Instruction - Checklist
Quiz: Multiple-choice questions that pertain to objectives above.

Module Four-The Secret of Attitude

Learning Objectives:

  • Model a positive attitude and behavior to be the most effective teacher.
  • Develop strategies for maintaining a positive attitude around negative teachers and/or administrators.
  • Define ways to temper negative attitudes in your students.
  • Establish guidelines for accepting responsibility in teaching outcomes.
  • Choose ways to defuse negative coworkers.
  • List three ways you can emulate most effective attitude in the faculty.
  • Evaluate your attitude towards parents.

Project 4: The Secret of Attitude - Checklist
Quiz: Multiple-choice questions that pertain to objectives above.

Module Five-The Secret of Professionalism

Learning Objectives:

  • Justify reasons for dressing professionally as a teacher.
  • List three ways to "fit in" with positive/effective teachers without "falling in" to gossipy/negative teachers.
  • Develop key strategies for maintaining professionalism with social media channels.
  • Define importance of continued professional growth and learning.
  • Describe best attributes of those teachers who exhibit highest level of professionalism.
  • List attributes of teachers that do their best every day.
  • Ask yourself this question with every lesson or decision, "Is this what's best for my students or easiest for me?"

Project 5: The Secret of Professionalism - Checklist
Quiz: Multiple-choice questions that pertain to objectives above.

Module Six-The Secret of Effective Discipline

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the secret to hiding your inflammatory spots, aka "buttons" from your students.
  • Evaluate your discipline practices to increase consistency.
  • Outline ways to use psychology to relieve stress and discipline problems in your classroom.
  • Choose alternatives to negativity and bitterness.
  • Justify reasoning for giving students what they want and need.
  • Display qualities of self-discipline.
  • Recognize the good in every child.

Project 6: The Secret of Effective Discipline - Checklist
Quiz: Multiple-choice questions that pertain to objectives above.

Module Seven-The Secret of Motivation and Inspiration

Learning Objectives:

  • Display techniques to motivate your students using excitement and positive attitude.
  • Distinguish how to make every student feel important and special.
  • Recognize the importance in knowing your students personally as well as in the classroom.
  • List the seven components of praise.
  • Identify how to use rewards and recognition to improve the behavior of students.
  • Adapt your personality traits to motivate unmotivated students.
  • Create strategies to maximize the power of you and your influence on your students.

Project 7: The Secret of Motivation and Inspiration - Checklist
Quiz: Multiple-choice questions that pertain to objectives above.

Final Exam

Multiple choice questions taken from each module

Final Learning Statement

Learning statements should be in a narrative format – as opposed to an outline format. Depending on individual writing styles Learning statements should be 2-3 pages. The learning statement can vary according to individual style. Your learning statement should answer the broad question of "what did you learn?". To help get you thinking, here are some suggested questions:

  • What are the major concepts of the course that you have learned?
  • What new professional language have you acquired relating to the topic?
  • What teaching techniques for implementing new strategies in the classroom did you come away with?
  • Thinking back to your project reflections, were you surprised at the outcomes?
  • What new resources did you find in the study of the content?
  • As an educator, what new concepts will you now integrate into your teaching?
  • Are there any ideas that presented themselves as enlightening and useful?

--- Sample Course Project ---

Seven Questions to Ask Yourself - Project #1 Overview

For this project, please take a moment to answer the following questions. Answering these questions will help you to determine whether you have mastered the Secret of Planning. Even if you have not yet mastered it, you may find that you’re almost there, that you require a little more effort in only one or two areas.

  • Do I plan lessons that focus on clear objectives and are designed to engage my students at each step of the learning process?
  • Do I always plan for more than I will probably need in order to accomplish the lesson’s objectives, making sure that any extra activities build on previous activities and are increasingly challenging?
  • Do I plan my lessons in short segments, ensuring that no one activity lasts too long?
  • Am I flexible when things don’t go exactly as planned, being careful not to allow myself to get bent out of shape when something unexpected occurs that puts a kink in my well-planned lesson?
  • Do I state my lesson’s objectives in clear and measurable terms, ensuring that all lesson activities focus solely on accomplishing those objectives?
  • Do I make every effort to plan activities that promote activity—meaning the students are continually encouraged to think and do as opposed to sit and listen?
  • Am I a proactive teacher who makes every effort to anticipate potential problems (while planning) and thus plans to ward off problems before they actualize?
For Your Project Reflection Submission

Take a moment to review your responses to these questions. For your reflection, share how these questions and answers relate to past learning, life experiences and/or future goals. Is there anything you might be able to improve upon after revisiting the Secret of Planning?

When you are ready, visit the "Module Projects" section located within the Course Dashboard to begin the process of submitting your project reflection.


Humboldt State University Credit Specifics

  • Academic Credit at the Graduate Level through Humboldt State University (HSU) is offered after successful completion of this course.
  • The 700 series semester credit is post-baccalaureate level appropriate for credentialed teachers which do not require admission to a graduate program.
  • 700-level classes are graduate level classes meant specifically for credential purposes, and are appropriate for license renewal or recertification.
  • Courses are letter graded on official transcripts from HSU.
  • HSU is the northernmost and westernmost institution in the 23-campus California State University (CSU) system.
  • HSU is accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges Senior College and University Commission (WSCUC), a regional accrediting agency serving a diverse membership of public and private higher education institutions.

Summer Option

If you are not currently teaching (ie. Summer break, you are a substitute teacher, etc.), each class offers you the ability to complete coursework independent of a classroom assignment.

What Great Teachers Do Differently
Course Fee: $80.00
Semester Credits: 1
Credit Fee: $50 through Humboldt State University
Any teacher can fill a bookshelf with books about education. Any teacher can study lists of guidelines, standards, principles, and theories. The best teachers and the worst teachers can ace exams in their undergraduate and graduate classes. The difference between more effective teachers and their less effective colleagues is not what they know. It is what they do. This course is about what great teachers do that sets them apart. Clarifying what the best educators do, and then practicing it ourselves, can move us into their ranks.

Course Reviews

"This course has served as a wonderful reminder of who I strive to be as an educator. The behaviors that were covered are all qualities that I attempt to display, but, like all of us probably, am not universally successful doing. Having the opportunity to reflect upon my practice and being redirected towards my true instructional goals has been a very positive experience."
-- J.C. from Ohio


"I really enjoyed this course and learning about what makes a great teacher. It has made me reflect on changes I can make with my behavior management and ways to support students through positive relationships rather than just seeing my students as learners of math or receivers of scores on state assessments. The way this course focused on the relationship part of teaching and not just grades and demonstrating an understanding of the curriculum was important to me."
-- C.R. from Oregon


"During this course I have learned so much and gained a tremendous amount of knowledge. I am happy to say that I have many new tools that I will be applying in my classroom."
-- A.P. from California


"I believe the framework provided in this course should be included in required training for all school staff (including service personnel, teachers, and administrators). This framework helps schools build solid learning environments by strengthening the overall foundation."
-- T.A. from West Virginia

Print or Share Outline

What Great Teachers Do Differently
Course Outline

Course Fee: $80
Course Numbers: EED x701 46774, SED x701 46783
Standard Course Time: 15 hours
Semester Credits: One (1) academic credit at the graduate level (available for an additional fee)
Credit Issued by: Humboldt State University (refer to our Graduate Credit page for credit pricing and details)
Subject Area: Special Topics
Author: Todd Whitaker, Ph.D.

Introduction/Course Description:

Any teacher can fill a bookshelf with books about education. Any teacher can study lists of guidelines, standards, principles, and theories. The best teachers and the worst teachers can ace exams in their undergraduate and graduate classes. The difference between more effective teachers and their less effective colleagues is not what they know. It is what they do. This course is about what great teachers do that sets them apart. Clarifying what the best educators do, and then practicing it ourselves, can move us into their ranks.

Course Objectives/Program Outline

This course is broken into major parts called modules. Each module contains content sections. Within each section, we cover one or more of the outlined learning objectives for the module. At the end of each module, there is a quiz. Some modules include a project. The breakdown for modules within this course is as follows:

Module One: Teacher as the Responsible Party

Learning Objectives:

  • Observe and analyze the struggle with your own self-awareness, ultimately redefining your own self perception.
  • Define the primary criterion when looking at program adoptions.
  • Understand what the variable is in terms of teacher expectations.
  • Define your high expectations for students and yourself.
  • Assess why successful teachers insist on focusing on their own behavior rather than the behavior of others.
  • Examine your own acceptance of responsibility as related to teacher efficacy.

Project 1: What Defines a Great Teacher?
Quiz: Multiple-choice questions that pertain to objectives above.

Module Two: Keep it Positive

Learning Objectives:

  • Assess what you have the ability to influence.
  • Describe variables that separate effective classroom managers from ineffective classroom managers.
  • Define the five necessary components of effective praise and measure the power of praise.
  • Evaluate the purpose of teachers serving as filters at the schools in which they teach, and discriminate issues that matter.

Project 2: Teacher, Parent and Child
Quiz: Multiple-choice questions that pertain to objectives above.

Module Three-Making Effective Change

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the importance of ignoring minor errors.
  • Formulate a more powerful deterrent to misbehavior than a list of predetermined rules and consequences.
  • Clarify "purpose" in order to head in a more productive direction.

Project 3: The Challenge of Classroom Management
Quiz: Multiple-choice questions that pertain to objectives above.

Module Four-What is Best for the Students

Learning Objectives:

  • Explore personal views related to student motivation, morale, classroom culture and climate. Identify behaviors that lead to success.
  • Describe the framework that sustains the work of all great educators.
  • Decide what personal core beliefs will drive your teaching.

Project 4: What Matters Most
Quiz: Multiple-choice questions that pertain to objectives above.

Final Exam

multiple choice questions taken from each module

Final Learning Statement

Learning statements should be in a narrative format – as opposed to an outline format. Depending on individual writing styles Learning statements should be 2-3 pages. The learning statement can vary according to individual style. Your learning statement should answer the broad question of "what did you learn?". To help get you thinking, here are some suggested questions:

  • What are the major concepts of the course that you have learned?
  • What new professional language have you acquired relating to the topic?
  • What teaching techniques for implementing new strategies in the classroom did you come away with?
  • Thinking back to your project reflections, were you surprised at the outcomes?
  • What new resources did you find in the study of the content?
  • As an educator, what new concepts will you now integrate into your teaching?
  • Are there any ideas that presented themselves as enlightening and useful?

--- Sample Course Project ---

Project #1 Overview

The difference between a good teacher and a great teacher is rooted in the teacher's ability to accurately self reflect with an emphasis on fine tuning high expectations for him/herself. For this project:

  • Write down as many names of teachers you had in your years in school, a fellow teacher you have worked with, or a peer that you admire and respect as an outstanding teacher.
  • From this group, identify and label characteristics for each teacher that made them great.
For Your Project Reflection Submission

Now that you have had some time to look at your list and identify the various characteristics of each teacher:

  • Share some of the fundamental differences between the good teachers and the great teachers as a whole that you have identified.
  • Be sure to pinpoint specific traits that distinguish your experience between the good and the great teachers.

Visit the "Module Projects" section located within the Course Dashboard, and take a moment to share your findings by submitting your project reflection.


Humboldt State University Credit Specifics

  • Academic Credit at the Graduate Level through Humboldt State University (HSU) is offered after successful completion of this course.
  • The 700 series semester credit is post-baccalaureate level appropriate for credentialed teachers which do not require admission to a graduate program.
  • 700-level classes are graduate level classes meant specifically for credential purposes, and are appropriate for license renewal or recertification.
  • Courses are letter graded on official transcripts from HSU.
  • HSU is the northernmost and westernmost institution in the 23-campus California State University (CSU) system.
  • HSU is accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges Senior College and University Commission (WSCUC), a regional accrediting agency serving a diverse membership of public and private higher education institutions.

Summer Option

If you are not currently teaching (ie. Summer break, you are a substitute teacher, etc.), each class offers you the ability to complete coursework independent of a classroom assignment.

Bullying Prevention - Keeping Schools Safe
Course Fee: $80.00
Semester Credits: 1
Credit Fee: $50 through Humboldt State University
In education, bullying is one of those terms that has been used so much recently that it tends to lose its meaning and impact. It is my desire that as a result of taking this course you will come away with a fresh perspective on the impact of bullying behaviors not only to the victims, but to the teachers, classroom and school dynamics, and to the bully. Unfortunately, if unchecked, the negative impacts on all involved can have devastating and life long consequences. This course has been designed to educate you as well as engage you in the learning process. Since this topic can trigger past bullying incidents that you may have experienced or witnessed, please take your time as you process this information.

Course Reviews

"This has been one of the most profound professional development courses that I have ever taken online. It covered so much meaningful content that will help impact so many students. I now better understand what bullying even is, who the victims are, what sorts of interventions are appropriate and how I can help introduce my entire school to a school wide bullying prevention program. "
-- A.P. from California


"This has been an amazing course. I truly have enjoyed it. I have found myself discussing it with my friends.  This is such vital information that needs to be shared. I personally feel that all educators should be required to take this class. "
-- K.H. from Kentucky


"After taking this course, I will be able to better identify a bully in my classroom and around the school. I will also be able to look for victim type behaviors to identify them. I know how to evaluate the situation and how to formulate a plan. I can give advice to a victim on how to handle being bullied and hopefully put an end to the situation. I can help a bully to understand why they are treating others the way that they are and work toward figuring out other ways to healthily handle their emotions. I can also point colleges in the direction of this course as a great training tool to better understand effective intervention strategies."
-- D.D. from Virginia


"This course has been very insightful and informative. The very first module helps identify bullying. It helped me to recognize the myths surrounding this topic. Which at times, as adults, we fall into making those mistakes and categorize certain behaviors as part of adolescence. I also realized that I need to be observant of the types of bullying and what it looks like in the classroom, cafeteria, playground and hallways. Some students will externalize it (this will more likely be the bully) while others will internalize it (this will typically be the victim). Being able to pick up on these behaviors is very important for prevention purposes. The deficiencies in character were also very helpful. Being able to reinforce values and beliefs into my students and teach them skills so that in turn they can make better choices is one key factor for me taking this course."
-- P.V. from California

Print or Share Outline

Bullying Prevention - Keeping Schools Safe
Course Outline

Course Fee: $80
Course Numbers: EED x701 46780, SED x701 46789
Standard Course Time: 15 hours
Semester Credits: One (1) academic credit at the graduate level (available for an additional fee)
Credit Issued by: Humboldt State University (refer to our Graduate Credit page for credit pricing and details)
Subject Area: Special Topics
Author: Jeff Foutty, M.A., Ed.S.

Introduction/Course Description

Although information about bullying is becoming more readily available, research is still being done to fully understand the long term effects of the new level of violence and aggression that is being seen and experienced in our schools. As each state responds to this bullying phenomenon, many have passed legislation to create safe schools and thus curb bullying behaviors. As you are being held accountable for improving student performance, it makes sense to create environments that foster effective learning. This course will provide you with terms, research, and classroom interventions so that you can more effectively identify bullying behaviors, identify those at risk for victimization, and create safe and healthy environments for your students.

This course is not designed to help you play police officer; it's about creating and providing students with a climate of safety and respect. This course will increase your ability to provide that environment so that those students under your care can thrive and succeed!

Course Objectives/Program Outline

This course is broken into major parts called modules. Each module contains content sections. Within each section, we cover one or more of the outlined learning objectives for the module. At the end of each module, there is a quiz. Some modules include a project. The breakdown for modules within this course is as follows:

Module One: What is Bullying?

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand what bullying is.
  • Identify the common myths associated with Bullying.
  • Recognize the types of bullying and understand behavioral extremes.
  • Identify deficiencies in character that increase the likelihood that someone will bully.
  • Understand the theories regarding how one becomes a bully.

Project 1: Typical Childhood Play or Bullying?
Quiz: Multiple-choice questions that pertain to objectives above.

Module Two- Who is the Victim?

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify who is the victim.
  • Identify the myths associated with victimization.
  • Identify warning signs that a child or adolescent is being bullied.
  • Understand the emotional impact of bullying.
  • Identify the different types of victims.

Project 2: Identifying Potential Victims
Quiz: Multiple-choice questions that pertain to objectives above.

Module Three- Interventions

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify the various conditions surrounding an intervention.
  • List helpful tips when choosing interventions.
  • Identify steps for creating bullying awareness in the classroom.
  • Describe intervention activities to address and change your student's awareness, attitudes, and beliefs about bullying.
  • Discover how to intervene with the victim and bully during an incident.
  • Provide the victim with practical interventions to decrease the likelihood of repeated bullying.
  • Provide the teacher with strategies and activities to decrease bullying incidents.
  • Discover how to effectively manage a bully immediately after an incident.
  • Examine strategies to decrease the likelihood of repeated bullying.

Project 3: Implementing a Bullying Intervention
Quiz: Multiple-choice questions that pertain to objectives above.

Module Four- Effective School Wide Bullying Programs

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify the reasons for creating safe and effective schools.
  • Identify what makes safe and effective schools.
  • Identify and review the laws behind safe schools.
  • Discover proven bullying prevention programs that you can advocate for your school.
  • Examine ways to get parents involved in the bullying prevention process.

Project 4: Create a Survey
Quiz: Multiple-choice questions that pertain to objectives above.

Final Exam

Multiple choice questions taken from each module

Final Learning Statement

Learning statements should be in a narrative format – as opposed to an outline format. Depending on individual writing styles Learning statements should be 2-3 pages. The learning statement can vary according to individual style. Your learning statement should answer the broad question of "what did you learn?". To help get you thinking, here are some suggested questions:

  • What are the major concepts of the course that you have learned?
  • What new professional language have you acquired relating to the topic?
  • What teaching techniques for implementing new strategies in the classroom did you come away with?
  • Thinking back to your project reflections, were you surprised at the outcomes?
  • What new resources did you find in the study of the content?
  • As an educator, what new concepts will you now integrate into your teaching?
  • Are there any ideas that presented themselves as enlightening and useful?

--- Sample Course Project ---

Typical Childhood Play or Bullying? - Project #1 Overview

The goal of this first project is to help you differentiate between typical childhood play and bullying. Below are two different situations that you may have dealt with in your classroom. Take a moment to read each situation, and determine if they describe typical play or bullying.

SITUATION ONE:

Janet is well liked by her teacher, but some kids call her the "teacher's pet." She often gets to run errands for her teachers during the day. Several of her classmates make hurtful and mean comments under their breath when she is asked to run an errand. On occasion several of them would go to the bathroom at the same time that Janet leaves to run her errands. While in the hallway, they will taunt and verbally harass her. This went on for six weeks. Although several of Janet's friends told her that she needed to tell her teacher, Janet was too afraid and felt that her teacher wouldn't believe her. Her teacher was disappointed when Janet told her that she did not want to run errands any more.

SITUATION TWO:

Bob is an 8th grader who is somewhat awkward with his peers. Although he wants to "fit in" he lacks the social savvy to say and do the right things at the right time. He is constantly picked on for what he wears, the way he carries his books, or how his hair looks. He tries to rehearse the right things to say at home, but when he gets to school, it doesn't come out right and everyone laughs. He has tried to take some initiative and sit with a group of boys at lunch that he thinks are "cool", but they make fun of him, knock his books out of his hands, or get up and leave when he comes over to their table. This treatment has spilled over to the hallway as well. Bob has spent many lunch periods in the nurse's office or helping his teacher. His teachers think Bob is demonstrating initiative for wanting to help during his lunch hour.

For Your Project Reflection Submission

So could you differentiate typical childhood play versus bullying between the 2 situations? If you think they are both examples of bullying, you are right. Again, the goal of this project is to get you thinking about what bullying looks like.

  • Would you be able to recognize a real-life bullying situation in your school?
  • Have you witnessed bullying within your classroom?

Share with us your own unique situation(s). Describe strategies you have used in the past to deal with a bullying situation.

Submit your reflection for this project by clicking on the "Submit Reflection" link in the Module Projects tile located in the Course Dashboard for this course.


Humboldt State University Credit Specifics

  • Academic Credit at the Graduate Level through Humboldt State University (HSU) is offered after successful completion of this course.
  • The 700 series semester credit is post-baccalaureate level appropriate for credentialed teachers which do not require admission to a graduate program.
  • 700-level classes are graduate level classes meant specifically for credential purposes, and are appropriate for license renewal or recertification.
  • Courses are letter graded on official transcripts from HSU.
  • HSU is the northernmost and westernmost institution in the 23-campus California State University (CSU) system.
  • HSU is accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges Senior College and University Commission (WSCUC), a regional accrediting agency serving a diverse membership of public and private higher education institutions.

Summer Option

If you are not currently teaching (ie. Summer break, you are a substitute teacher, etc.), each class offers you the ability to complete coursework independent of a classroom assignment.

ELL in the Classroom Refresher
Course Fee: $80.00
Semester Credits: 1
Credit Fee: $50 through Humboldt State University
This course will be presenting the best ways to educate ELL students and to ensure that they are learning content while mastering a new language and adapting to a new home country. Our challenge as teachers is to know how to reach these students, to teach them, and to know what to do when they cannot express themselves to us. As teachers we need to help them learn to succeed so they can be productive citizens. There is much we teachers can do to awaken the power within the students to help themselves and to feel empowered.

Course Reviews

"I found the ELL in the Classroom Refresher course to be a well organized, clear and topically useful course. It was clear and concise with content chunked to help make it easy to understand. The presentation was efficient and effective. From the course, I found concepts I was unaware of and had some of my classroom practices reaffirmed. After completing the course, I feel better prepared to help my ELL students achieve greater academic success while improving their English."
-- D.H. from Thailand


"This course was very beneficial in understanding the specific needs of English language learners. Some of the major concepts that I took away from this course include (1) lowering the effective filter and keeping my classroom a safe place for language learners to try new language structures, (2) providing context for the lesson with activating prior knowledge and previewing vocabulary words, and (3) using graphic organizers and visuals to help assist the EL students. In addition, I also learned the differences between social language (BICS) and academic language (CALP). "
-- C.S. from Kansas


"I have added much to my tool belt as a teacher. I was surprised at many of the culture differences and am more aware of these differences. And differences still to be discovered. It is always about expanding the way we teach. As we know all learns learn at different rates and through different techniques. This class was not only provided great ideas and practice for teaching the ELL students, but to all students across the board. With the projected rate of 40% ELL students in the year 2030, this is not only useful knowledge, but essential knowledge."
-- D.P. from Colorado

Print or Share Outline

ELL in the Classroom Refresher
Course Outline

Course Fee: $80
Course Numbers: EED x701 46779, SED x701 46788
Standard Course Time: 15 hours
Semester Credits: One (1) academic credit at the graduate level (available for an additional fee)
Credit Issued by: Humboldt State University (refer to our Graduate Credit page for credit pricing and details)
Subject Area: Review of Teaching Fundamentals
Author: Carolyn R. Smith, B.S., ESL Endorsement

Although this review of teaching fundamentals course is taught as stand alone class, we believe that the best teaching practices involve the seamless integration of all pedagogical practices. This and other courses serve as a review of the most essential teaching components, which, when integrated together, create the backdrop for the larger professional development for practicing teachers.

Introduction/Course Description:

This class will be presenting the best ways to educate ELL students and to ensure that they are learning content while mastering a new language and adapting to a new home country. Our challenge as teachers is to know how to reach these students, to teach them, and to know what to do when they cannot express themselves to us. As teachers we need to help them learn to succeed so they can be productive citizens. There is much teachers can do to awaken the power within the students to help themselves and to feel empowered.

It is important for teachers of ELL students to understand that second language learning by school-aged children is a longer, harder, more complex process than most of us have been led to believe. We need to have an accurate understanding of the process of second language learning and its relationship to acquiring other academic skills and knowledge. This class will be presenting MANY strategies that we can quickly and easily incorporate into our existing curriculum to help meet the needs of the ELL students.

Course Objectives/Program Outline

This course is broken into major parts called modules. Each module contains content sections. Within each section, we cover one or more of the outlined learning objectives for the module. At the end of each module, there is a quiz. Some modules include a project. The breakdown for modules within this course is as follows:

Module One: Language Acquisition

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the 5 stages of Language Acquisition and implement teaching strategies for each stage.
  • Make accommodations in the classroom which will have positive influences on the factors affecting Language Acquisition.
  • Distinguish between the BICS and CALP level of language acquisition

Project 1: Applying BICS and CALP
Quiz: Multiple-choice questions that pertain to objectives above.

Module Two: Acculturation

Learning Objectives:

  • Develop an understanding of what happens when a child is living between languages/cultural worlds.
  • Define the stages of acculturation.
  • Identify the importance of cross-cultural interactions among students by understanding the difference between assimilation and acculturation.
  • Learn techniques that can be used to encourage parental involvement

Project 2: Gestures and Culture
Quiz: Multiple-choice questions that pertain to objectives above.

Module Three-Teaching Strategies

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the importance of ELL students Learning through Language.
  • Explore the value of culture and its importance in helping students belong.
  • Create modifications and adaptations to existing curriculum to help make content more comprehensible.
  • Identify specific strategies for teaching reading and writing in the classroom.

Project 3: Audit a Lesson Plan
Quiz: Multiple-choice questions that pertain to objectives above.

Final Exam

multiple choice questions taken from each module

Final Learning Statement

Learning statements should be in a narrative format – as opposed to an outline format. Depending on individual writing styles Learning statements should be 2-3 pages. The learning statement can vary according to individual style. Your learning statement should answer the broad question of "what did you learn?". To help get you thinking, here are some suggested questions:

  • What are the major concepts of the course that you have learned?
  • What new professional language have you acquired relating to the topic?
  • What teaching techniques for implementing new strategies in the classroom did you come away with?
  • Thinking back to your project reflections, were you surprised at the outcomes?
  • What new resources did you find in the study of the content?
  • As an educator, what new concepts will you now integrate into your teaching?
  • Are there any ideas that presented themselves as enlightening and useful?

--- Sample Course Project ---

Applying Bics and Calp - Project #1 Overview

As we discussed in the prior section, the Cummins' Model is expanded by quadrants. For this project, you will be attempting to identify the amount of cognitive demand and context you think is involved in the completion of each task listed below.

Instructions for this Project: Place the appropriate letter representing quadrant A, B, C, or D from Cummins' Model of Academic Language at the end of each statement. Choose the letter that best represents the amount of cognitive demand and context you think is involved in the completion of each task. You may want to print this page and refer to the previous section in order to complete the project.

(printable task list has been omitted for this sample project)

For Your Project Reflection Submission

Once you have placed each task within a specific quadrant, take a moment to review them. Can you see the difference between the levels of language proficiency in your students? It is important to understand that you may have an ELL student who can carry on a conversation with you, but does not have the cognitive development to keep up with class work successfully.

  • Knowing that your ELL students will perform best when information is given to them in the "B" quadrant (context embedded AND cognitively demanding), what can you do to make any class work or assignments fit into that quadrant?

Visit the "Module Projects" section located within the Course Dashboard, and take a moment to share your findings by submitting your project reflection.


Humboldt State University Credit Specifics

  • Academic Credit at the Graduate Level through Humboldt State University (HSU) is offered after successful completion of this course.
  • The 700 series semester credit is post-baccalaureate level appropriate for credentialed teachers which do not require admission to a graduate program.
  • 700-level classes are graduate level classes meant specifically for credential purposes, and are appropriate for license renewal or recertification.
  • Courses are letter graded on official transcripts from HSU.
  • HSU is the northernmost and westernmost institution in the 23-campus California State University (CSU) system.
  • HSU is accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges Senior College and University Commission (WSCUC), a regional accrediting agency serving a diverse membership of public and private higher education institutions.

Summer Option

If you are not currently teaching (ie. Summer break, you are a substitute teacher, etc.), each class offers you the ability to complete coursework independent of a classroom assignment.

Differentiated Instruction Refresher
Course Fee: $80.00
Semester Credits: 1
Credit Fee: $50 through Humboldt State University
This course is designed to define Differentiated Instruction and demonstrate how educators can get excited about meeting the needs of the varied individuals in their classrooms. It is the goal to provide the classroom teacher with simple ways to start differentiating today, as well as provide an abundance of ideas and tools to better meet the needs of students no matter what subject matter or grade level taught. Differentiated Instruction can be adapted to meet different teaching styles. There is no single formula to follow; just basic guidelines which can be implemented as comfort levels increase. In this course, we will also tackle the tough issues of managing and assessing students in a differentiated classroom. It is my hope that as you work your way through this course that you realize and are encouraged by the fact that you most likely already do some differentiating already by using sound instructional strategies.

Course Reviews

"When I was looking at the list of options online for classes, I was excited to see this course being offered. It seems that differentiating instruction has always been a challenge throughout my teaching career, but has become more so of a challenge as special education requirements change, curriculum demands become increasingly rigorous, the amount of children with attention difficulties seems to increase year after year and budget cuts cause the phasing out of specialist teachers.
Thank you for offering such a complete, concise and user friendly class for educators. This is the kind of learning I like best; reflective, meaningful, easily applied and at my own pace. I am walking away with knowledge I have used and will continue to use and well as practical applications for my classroom, the dream of all teachers. Can't wait to share with my colleagues!"
-- M.A. from Illinois


"I have enjoyed taking the Differentiated Instruction Refresher course. This course has provided a good refresher of what differentiated instruction is, why it is important, and has had some good suggestions for ways to better differentiate in a classroom setting. While I have always known how important differentiation is, it is very easy to get caught up in teaching to the middle students in a classroom while the lower and higher students often get left out. After taking this course I feel that I have several new strategies to implement into my classroom to better differentiate learning for my students."
-- S.M. from Ohio


"The class really helped me understand how my anchors can fully extend student learning and engagement. Instead of treating these as an after thought to ensure that early finishers "stay busy" I can take a little more time to ensure that these valuable teaching tools meet and extend learning objectives.
Differentiation has been one of the most intimidating aspects of teaching such a wide range of ages, grades, and ability levels. The strategies I learned in this class will help me support myself to grow as a teacher as I practice the different techniques to see what works and what doesn't for my situation. It also helped me by identifying the differentiation strategies I already employ and by giving language to the nuances of this valuable pedagogy."
-- B.S. from California

Print or Share Outline

Differentiated Instruction Refresher
Course Outline

Course Fee: $80
Course Numbers: EED x701 46778, SED x701 46787
Standard Course Time: 15 hours
Semester Credits: One (1) academic credit at the graduate level (available for an additional fee)
Credit Issued by: Humboldt State University (refer to our Graduate Credit page for credit pricing and details)
Subject Area: Review of Teaching Fundamentals
Author: Steve Heiniger, M.A.

Although this review of teaching fundamentals course is taught as stand alone class, we believe that the best teaching practices involve the seamless integration of all pedagogical practices. This and other courses serve as a review of the most essential teaching components, which, when integrated together, create the backdrop for the larger professional development for practicing teachers.

Introduction/Course Description:

This course is designed to define Differentiated Instruction and demonstrate how educators can get excited about meeting the needs of the varied individuals in their classrooms. It is the goal to provide the classroom teacher with simple ways to start differentiating today, as well as provide an abundance of ideas and tools to better meet the needs of students no matter what subject matter or grade level taught. Differentiated instruction can be adapted to meet different teaching styles. There is no single formula to follow; just basic guidelines which can be implemented as comfort levels increase. In this course, we will also tackle the tough issues of managing and assessing students in a differentiated classroom. It is my hope that as you work your way through this course that you realize and are encouraged by the fact that you most likely already do some differentiating already by using sound instructional strategies.

Course Objectives/Program Outline

This course is broken into major parts called modules. Each module contains content sections. Within each section, we cover one or more of the outlined learning objectives for the module. At the end of each module, there is a quiz. Some modules include a project. The breakdown for modules within this course is as follows:

Module One: What is Differentiated Instruction

Learning Objectives:

  • Provide a working definition for Differentiated Instruction.
  • Describe and offer examples of how to vary the content in order to differentiate instruction.
  • Identify how to vary the processes of how students learn in order to accommodate their individual learning styles, interests, and needs.
  • Explain how to offer a choice of products in order to accommodate the individual learning styles, interests, and needs of students.
  • Investigate the impact that student interest, readiness, and learning style has on instruction.

Project 1: Learning Style Surveys
Quiz: Multiple-choice questions that pertain to objectives above.

Module Two: Where Do I Start?

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify "Micro" strategies that the classroom teacher can use to begin differentiating instruction.
  • Introduce "Macro" differentiation, and explore ways to allow students to set their own depth of study through the use of Layered Describe Extension Activities and how they differ from a traditional Layered Curriculum
  • Describe Extension Activities and how they differ from a traditional Layered Curriculum.
  • Explore additional "Macro" models of differentiated instruction that can be used for all grade levels and subject matters.

Project 2: Layered Curriculum
Quiz: Multiple-choice questions that pertain to objectives above.

Module Three-Managing the Classroom Environment

Learning Objectives:

  • Explore the natural benefits of differentiating and how the brain applies.
  • Examine the importance of readiness, interests and individual learning styles.
  • Introduce "anchoring activities" as a way to enhance the differentiated experience.
  • Offer practical suggestions for maintaining a productive atmosphere in which cooperation and collaboration are the goals.

Project 3: Anchoring Activities
Quiz: Multiple-choice questions that pertain to objectives above.

Module Four-Grading and Assessment Tools

Learning Objectives:

  • Highlight sound educational assessment principles.
  • Identify and develop rubrics for classroom use. Understand what a portfolio is, and why they work.
  • Explore ways to construct a portfolio of skills for future use.
  • Identify additional tools to assess learning in a differentiated classroom.

Project 4: Create a Rubric
Quiz: Multiple-choice questions that pertain to objectives above.

Final Exam

Multiple choice questions taken from each module

Final Learning Statement

Learning statements should be in a narrative format – as opposed to an outline format. Depending on individual writing styles Learning statements should be 2-3 pages. The learning statement can vary according to individual style. Your learning statement should answer the broad question of "what did you learn?". To help get you thinking, here are some suggested questions:

  • What are the major concepts of the course that you have learned?
  • What new professional language have you acquired relating to the topic?
  • What teaching techniques for implementing new strategies in the classroom did you come away with?
  • Thinking back to your project reflections, were you surprised at the outcomes?
  • What new resources did you find in the study of the content?
  • As an educator, what new concepts will you now integrate into your teaching?
  • Are there any ideas that presented themselves as enlightening and useful?

--- Sample Course Project ---

Learning Style Surveys - Project #1 Overview

Matching teaching style to learning style can have a dramatic effect on student attention in your classroom. Whether auditory, visual, kinesthetic or read/write, the way you learn is probably the way you teach. Because of this, it is important for you to understand your own learning preference, and thus become aware of the effect that it has on your teaching style.

For this project, we would like for you to participate in a learning style survey. While taking the survey, pay attention to what you might learn about yourself. Think about how you teach your lessons; might you notice a correlation between how you teach and your preferred learning style?

In order to execute your online learning style assessment, conduct a Web search using the following words:

vark-learn questionnaire

The results will provide you with an online learning style survey at vark-learn.com. Complete the online survey, taking note to the results provided in relation to your learning style.

Once you have completed your survey and have identified your learning style(s), let's find out more about how your students learn.

  • Begin by writing down each student's name onto a piece of paper, and categorize the students into the different types of learning styles: auditory, visual, kinesthetic or read/write.
  • Once completed, consider an upcoming lesson. How might what you learn about each student and their learning styles alter your teaching delivery?
For Your Project Reflection Submission

You may wish to use the following questions to guide your thoughts:

  • What type of learner are you? Did it surprise you?
  • Do you feel that the statement "the way you learn is probably the way you teach" is accurate?
  • What did you learn about your students?
  • How might you alter your teaching style to accomodate the different learning styles?

Visit the "Module Projects" section located within the Course Dashboard, and take a moment to share your findings by submitting your project reflection.


Humboldt State University Credit Specifics

  • Academic Credit at the Graduate Level through Humboldt State University (HSU) is offered after successful completion of this course.
  • The 700 series semester credit is post-baccalaureate level appropriate for credentialed teachers which do not require admission to a graduate program.
  • 700-level classes are graduate level classes meant specifically for credential purposes, and are appropriate for license renewal or recertification.
  • Courses are letter graded on official transcripts from HSU.
  • HSU is the northernmost and westernmost institution in the 23-campus California State University (CSU) system.
  • HSU is accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges Senior College and University Commission (WSCUC), a regional accrediting agency serving a diverse membership of public and private higher education institutions.

Summer Option

If you are not currently teaching (ie. Summer break, you are a substitute teacher, etc.), each class offers you the ability to complete coursework independent of a classroom assignment.

Assessment and Testing Refresher
Course Fee: $80.00
Semester Credits: 1
Credit Fee: $50 through Humboldt State University
Many teachers know what students should be learning. Many have met all of the state standards, the objectives, the scope and sequence outlined neatly in front of them. But sometimes, what is missing is a way to properly assess and evaluate students honestly and accurately. In this course, we will provide you with the assessment information and tools to use in the classroom so that the process works for you and your students.

Course Reviews

"While this course has already helped me make some progress in assessing students, it also showed me areas where I need to grow. I am excited about the concepts I have learned and the progress that I have already made. I look forward to continuing to grow in this area in order to improve my students' educational experience."
-- J.R. from Maryland


"The course has been an excellent revisit to various types of assessments and has given me an opportunity to reflect on the type of assessments that I currently use in my own courses."
-- D.P. from Colorado


"The major concepts of this course that I have learned begin with assessment and evaluation. How we assess and evaluate our class and students plays an important part of our job. We must be aware of the process and work to do it adequately and effective. We then looked at a mission and vision. We must be able to identify what we are doing and how we are going to get there. Our beliefs are important and must be an important part our class being able to learn. We have program and unit outcomes that will make up the class lessons and how we plan on getting from the start to the finish. What is authentic assessment? How is authentic assessment done? These were key issues used to measure and test student achievement. The last group of concepts we worked on were student portfolios and scoring guides. These are very useful in determining what the students learned and how the student performed in the classroom."
-- R.R. from Arkansas

Print or Share Outline

Assessment and Testing Refresher
Course Outline

Course Fee: $80
Course Numbers: EED x701 46776, SED x701 46785
Standard Course Time: 15 hours
Semester Credits: One (1) academic credit at the graduate level (available for an additional fee)
Credit Issued by: Humboldt State University (refer to our Graduate Credit page for credit pricing and details)
Subject Area: Review of Teaching Fundamentals
Author: Zoe Edelen, MAT

Although this review of teaching fundamentals course is taught as stand alone class, we believe that the best teaching practices involve the seamless integration of all pedagogical practices. This and other courses serve as a review of the most essential teaching components, which, when integrated together, create the backdrop for the larger professional development for practicing teachers.

Introduction/Course Description:

Many teachers know what students should be learning. Many have met all of the state standards, the objectives, the scope and sequence outlined neatly in front of them. But sometimes, what is missing is a way to properly assess and evaluate students honestly and accurately. This is called Authentic Assessment. In this course, we will provide you with the assessment information and tools to use in the classroom so that the process works for you and your students.

Course Objectives/Program Outline

This course is broken into major parts called modules. Each module contains content sections. Within each section, we cover one or more of the outlined learning objectives for the module. At the end of each module, there is a quiz. Some modules include a project. The breakdown for modules within this course is as follows:

Module One: Introduction to Assessment and Testing

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify key definitions of assessment and evaluation.
  • Understand the history of standardized testing in this country.

Quiz: Multiple-choice questions that pertain to objectives above.

Module Two: Mission, Vision, Beliefs, Program Outcomes, Unit Outcomes and Competencies

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify and create a mission and vision for your class and understand their purpose.
  • Understand your own beliefs and use the results to create a better classroom environment.
  • Develop program and unit outcomes for your classes.

Project 1: Creating Your Own Class Roadmap
Quiz: Multiple-choice questions that pertain to objectives above.

Module Three-Authentic Assessment and Helpful Evaluations

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand and comprehend authentic assessment and its purpose.
  • Identify what authentic assessment looks like in the classroom through helpful evaluations.
  • Explore a variety of cognitive skill tests to validate student learning.
  • Develop a written evaluation of an instructor.

Project 2: Evaluation Checklist
Quiz: Multiple-choice questions that pertain to objectives above.

Module Four-Portfolios and Scoring Guides

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand what a portfolio is, and why they work.
  • Explore ways to construct a portfolio of skills for future use.
  • Understand scoring guides and why they are a useful tool for classroom use.
  • Identify tips for creating scoring guides.

Project 3: Creating a Scoring Guide
Quiz: Multiple-choice questions that pertain to objectives above.

Final Exam

Multiple choice questions taken from each module

Final Learning Statement

Learning statements should be in a narrative format – as opposed to an outline format. Depending on individual writing styles Learning statements should be 2-3 pages. The learning statement can vary according to individual style. Your learning statement should answer the broad question of "what did you learn?". To help get you thinking, here are some suggested questions:

  • What are the major concepts of the course that you have learned?
  • What new professional language have you acquired relating to the topic?
  • What teaching techniques for implementing new strategies in the classroom did you come away with?
  • Thinking back to your project reflections, were you surprised at the outcomes?
  • What new resources did you find in the study of the content?
  • As an educator, what new concepts will you now integrate into your teaching?
  • Are there any ideas that presented themselves as enlightening and useful?

--- Sample Course Project ---

Creating Your Own Classroom Roadmap - Project #1 Overview

Now that we have discussed mission, vision, beliefs, program and unit outcomes, it is your turn to put this knowledge to work. The goal of this project is to get you thinking about creating your own "roadmap" in order to provide a clear and concise pathway for your classroom. For this project:

  • Write your vision and mission for your classroom. Remember it may take you several tries to get something that you feel is clear and concise and can be used by you to develop your program and unit outcomes.
  • After you have clear, concise mission and vision statements, create 8-12 program outcomes, along with 5 unit outcomes for each.

For Your Project Reflection Submission

Give us your thoughts in regards to creating your own classroom mission, vision, beliefs, program and unit outcomes. More specifically:

  • Share your thoughts on the process of creating your mission, vision, belief, program and unit outcomes.
  • Will the "roadmap" you created prove useful within your classroom?

Submit your reflection for this project by clicking on the "Submit Reflection" link in the Module Projects tile located in the Course Dashboard for this course.


Humboldt State University Credit Specifics

  • Academic Credit at the Graduate Level through Humboldt State University (HSU) is offered after successful completion of this course.
  • The 700 series semester credit is post-baccalaureate level appropriate for credentialed teachers which do not require admission to a graduate program.
  • 700-level classes are graduate level classes meant specifically for credential purposes, and are appropriate for license renewal or recertification.
  • Courses are letter graded on official transcripts from HSU.
  • HSU is the northernmost and westernmost institution in the 23-campus California State University (CSU) system.
  • HSU is accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges Senior College and University Commission (WSCUC), a regional accrediting agency serving a diverse membership of public and private higher education institutions.

Summer Option

If you are not currently teaching (ie. Summer break, you are a substitute teacher, etc.), each class offers you the ability to complete coursework independent of a classroom assignment.

Educational Psychology Refresher
Course Fee: $80.00
Semester Credits: 1
Credit Fee: $50 through Humboldt State University
Throughout this course, we will be taking a look at the 'learning' process. We will start with the anatomy of the brain and examine how we process/make decisions, and how those decisions are reflected in our personality traits. We will also explore individual learning styles and identify instructional strategies aimed at each of those styles, types of intelligence's, and teamwork. These lessons will provide the foundation for developing your own classroom teaching strategies.

Course Reviews

"This is the most interesting course that I have taken for a very long time. I am a Family and Consumer Science teacher, and I spent some time working in the social work field, so the psychology field really interests me. For the most part, everything that I learned from the class was new information. I had taken psychology classes in college, but it had been a long time, and I am sure that I have forgotten a lot of what I had learned, so this was a great course for me to gain new knowledge and feel refreshed as a teacher.

This class was great; practically everything in the class was new information. I have bookmarked the reference section and added some of my own to use in my classroom. Also, every fall my principal has us develop a belief statement; mine is done. I really enjoyed learning about the multiple intelligences and how the brain works and personality develops. My assessment was a little surprising to me, but I think it is correct. I am happy to recommend this class to a fellow teacher."
-- D.D. from Indiana


"The importance of continued education for teachers is always something that comes to mind once I am in the thralls of coursework. As educators we get so caught up in all that is required of us, the new demands, the changes in curriculum, etc., etc. This educational psychology class is of particular value as it brings one back to the basics, reminds one of the essential needs, how and why we learn and react the way we do. It reminds one of the different learning styles, modes of delivery that are essential in the classroom and the importance of teamwork."
--T.K. from Washington


"The biggest takeaway from this course is the realization that education consists of helping people of endless personality differences acquire knowledge and skills that will be valuable for them. Going through these materials helped me realize the great challenge of being the educator I want to be. At the same I sometimes felt discouraged when I would try to think about how I can possibly design classes that will help learners of all types acquire knowledge when I am the teacher."
-- J.F. from Colorado

Print or Share Outline

Educational Psychology Refresher
Course Outline

Course Fee: $80
Course Numbers: EED x701 46777, SED x701 46786
Standard Course Time: 15 hours
Semester Credits: One (1) academic credit at the graduate level (available for an additional fee)
Credit Issued by: Humboldt State University (refer to our Graduate Credit page for credit pricing and details)
Subject Area: Review of Teaching Fundamentals
Author: R. Andrew McColley, CEC, CCE, CWDP

Although this review of teaching fundamentals course is taught as stand alone class, we believe that the best teaching practices involve the seamless integration of all pedagogical practices. This and other courses serve as a review of the most essential teaching components, which, when integrated together, create the backdrop for the larger professional development for practicing teachers.

Introduction/Course Description:

Throughout this course, we will be taking a look at the 'learning' process. We will start with the anatomy of the brain and examine how we process/make decisions, and how those decisions are reflected in our personality traits. We will also explore individual learning styles and identify instructional strategies aimed at each of those styles, types of intelligence's, and teamwork. These lessons will provide the foundation for developing your own classroom teaching strategies.

Course Objectives/Program Outline

This course is broken into major parts called modules. Each module contains content sections. Within each section, we cover one or more of the outlined learning objectives for the module. At the end of each module, there is a quiz. Some modules include a project. The breakdown for modules within this course is as follows:

Module One-Mental Development

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify the different quadrants of the brain.
  • Compare and contrast Maslow's and Glasser's theories.
  • Articulate the differences in the way each person processes information.
  • Analyze Bloom's Taxonomy and the three learning domains.
  • Appreciate the value of an enriched environment.
  • Value the importance of a safe and needs fulfilling learning environment.

Quiz: Multiple-choice questions that pertain to objectives above.

Module Two-Developmental Factors

Learning Objectives:

  • Illustrate the importance of heredity and environment while critiquing the "nature vs. nurture" controversy.
  • Assign distinct attributes of an adolescent: physical changes, the importance of groups, conformity and self-identity and ways to resolve conflict.
  • Examine adulthood in respect to the time of life when one tries to bring everything together into a whole.
  • Differentiate the myths and realities of the similarities and dissimilarities between males and females.
  • Evaluate Piaget's four stages of child development, and differentiate between the three stages of moral development.

Project 1: Values and Beliefs
Quiz: Multiple-choice questions that pertain to objectives above.

Module Three-Personality Types

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify the differences between type A and type B personalities.
  • Appreciate the differences between introverts and extroverts.
  • Recognize the age-old personality types first formalized by Hippocrates.
  • Examine and value the different traits of each personality type.

Project 2: The Jung Typology Test
Quiz: Multiple-choice questions that pertain to objectives above.

Module Four-Learning Styles and Communication

Learning Objectives:

  • Recognize the three different types of learners.
  • Develop materials, activities, and projects that address the various intelligences found in the classroom.
  • Characterize the eight ways of "being smart."
  • Understand how our communication styles affect others.
  • Explain all of the components that make up communication and the art involved in using it effectively.
  • Appreciate and value the importance of clear and concise expectations.

Project 3: Learning Style Survey
Quiz: Multiple-choice questions that pertain to objectives above.

Module Five-Teamwork

Learning Objectives:

  • Explain the social, collaborative, and task dimensions of teamwork.
  • Investigate the steps needed and the stages of development required that teams must prepare for and adapt to the challenges of collective work.
  • Review strategies that experiential learning offers in building social bonds, analyzing problems, and implementing decisions.

Quiz: Multiple-choice questions that pertain to objectives above.

Final Exam

multiple choice questions taken from each module

Final Learning Statement

Learning statements should be in a narrative format – as opposed to an outline format. Depending on individual writing styles Learning statements should be 2-3 pages. The learning statement can vary according to individual style. Your learning statement should answer the broad question of "what did you learn?". To help get you thinking, here are some suggested questions:

  • What are the major concepts of the course that you have learned?
  • What new professional language have you acquired relating to the topic?
  • What teaching techniques for implementing new strategies in the classroom did you come away with?
  • Thinking back to your project reflections, were you surprised at the outcomes?
  • What new resources did you find in the study of the content?
  • As an educator, what new concepts will you now integrate into your teaching?
  • Are there any ideas that presented themselves as enlightening and useful?

--- Sample Course Project ---

Values and Beliefs - Project #1 Overview

One really powerful tool that will help you grow as an instructor is to evaluate your own beliefs and values not only as they pertain to your teaching life, but to your personal and professional lives as well. For this application, though, we will look at just the values and beliefs that are relevant to your life as a teacher.

Belief statements are those values that you hold so sacrosanct that you'd "go to the mat" for them. Without these certain principles operating in your classroom, you would leave teaching. Identifying these values that you hold will help you define your teaching style, in addition to giving purpose to the environment you are trying to build for your students.

Belief statements need to be written in clear and concise language, so that all of your audiences, your students, their parents, your administrators, your advisory committees, and the general public, can understand them. The following are some sample belief statements written by various teachers. Belief statements are so personal, though, that while some of these may fit your intention, you need to customize your own, so that they reflect what you want your constituents to know about you as a teacher and what you believe and value.

Sample Belief Statements
  • All students have the right to a safe, clean, orderly and nurturing learning atmosphere.
  • Students should have the opportunity to develop critical minds and sound bodies, lifelong learning habits and a variety of creative and academic skills to express their ideas, beliefs, experiences and needs.
  • Education is a shared responsibility for all: students, parents, staff, and community.
  • All stakeholders should teach and model responsible behavior, respect, fairness, and honesty.
  • Understanding and appreciation of cultural diversity creates a successful learning environment, facilitates student learning, and strengthens students' self-esteem.
  • Caring, sustained communication among all stakeholders in an educational setting is essential to the success of the organization.
  • It is essential that all parents, especially those for whom English is not their native language, understand all communication from school to home.
  • Schools should be provided with the resources to address the emotional and physical needs, as well as the academic needs of the student.
  • A student's individual potential is independent of race, gender, or socioeconomic status.
For Your Project Reflection Submission

Now it's your turn. For the project for this module, develop a few belief statements that reflect your values in teaching. Spend some time thinking about what you value about yourself as a teacher, your students, your shared environment, etc.

  • What are those values and beliefs that you couldn't teach without?
  • How would you like to present those to your multiple audiences?

Visit the "Module Projects" section located within the Course Dashboard, and take a moment to share your findings by submitting your project reflection.


Humboldt State University Credit Specifics

  • Academic Credit at the Graduate Level through Humboldt State University (HSU) is offered after successful completion of this course.
  • The 700 series semester credit is post-baccalaureate level appropriate for credentialed teachers which do not require admission to a graduate program.
  • 700-level classes are graduate level classes meant specifically for credential purposes, and are appropriate for license renewal or recertification.
  • Courses are letter graded on official transcripts from HSU.
  • HSU is the northernmost and westernmost institution in the 23-campus California State University (CSU) system.
  • HSU is accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges Senior College and University Commission (WSCUC), a regional accrediting agency serving a diverse membership of public and private higher education institutions.

Summer Option

If you are not currently teaching (ie. Summer break, you are a substitute teacher, etc.), each class offers you the ability to complete coursework independent of a classroom assignment.

Teaching Methods Refresher
Course Fee: $80.00
Semester Credits: 1
Credit Fee: $50 through Humboldt State University
This course will take you on a journey of reflection and hopefully, inspiration. Since you are a teacher in the classroom, the truly difficult work is already being done. We are teachers ourselves and know how many long hours go into preparing just one class. This course has been designed to help you reflect upon your own teaching methods and possibly offer some new ideas for you to add to your teaching palate. We hope to make this course informative as well as engaging. Your time is valuable and we want to offer practical tools for you to use in the classroom. I remember so many classes in graduate school that looked great on paper but offered no tools for me to use back in the classroom. This course is different. You will walk away with practical tools to help focus your lessons and improve student learning. All you need is an open mind, a writing journal, and a classroom in which to test out some new ideas.

Course Reviews

"In this course I learned many different ways to reach my students to maximize learning. I learned that lecturing doesn't have to be a boring, run of the mill thing, but something that should be looked upon as a challenge to keep the audience involved. I'm very glad I got the chance to watch myself teach, as there never seems to be enough time in the normal day to see these things. I'm also glad I took the time to watch my colleague teach; I picked up a bunch of good ideas from him, and think I'll be visiting his classroom more often to keep the ideas coming."
--T.H. from Minnesota


"This course was very useful in covering teaching strategies and resources that will be useful for my classroom. The three modules made me reflect on my own teaching style and gave me some useful tools for planning, preparing, carrying out, and assessing my lessons I have in my class. I thoroughly enjoyed taking this refresher course and it reminded me to make use of some of the great tools and strategies covered in this course which I believe will carry over to my student's education the classroom."
-- D.C. from Texas


"As I look back on the projects for this course, I was very much surprised, especially from the Jigsaw activity. The whole process of a cooperative learning environment helped my students acquire concrete information on the reading assignment and hence obtain key points that helped them score higher on their quiz. This was definitely an eye opener for me. This is definitely a concept I will be implementing in my classes.

I was able to learn something new from every module in this course. They were all key elements in facilitating me to become an effective and productive teacher. I will definitely be implementing all these strategies in my lesson plans, teaching methods and cooperative learning projects. This was a very useful and educational course. "
-- P.V. from California

Print or Share Outline

Teaching Methods Refresher
Course Outline

Course Fee: $80
Course Numbers: EED x701 46775, SED x701 46784
Standard Course Time: 15 hours
Semester Credits: One (1) academic credit at the graduate level (available for an additional fee)
Credit Issued by: Humboldt State University (refer to our Graduate Credit page for credit pricing and details)
Subject Area: Review of Teaching Fundamentals
Author: Zoe Edelen, MAT

Although this review of teaching fundamentals course is taught as stand alone class, we believe that the best teaching practices involve the seamless integration of all pedagogical practices. This and other courses serve as a review of the most essential teaching components, which, when integrated together, create the backdrop for the larger professional development for practicing teachers.

Introduction/Course Description:

This course has been designed to help you reflect upon your own teaching methods and possibly offer some new ideas for you to add to your teaching palate. We hope to make this course informative as well as engaging. Your time is valuable and we want to offer practical tools for you to use in the classroom. I remember so many classes in graduate school that looked great on paper but offered no tools for me to use back in the classroom. This course is different. You will walk away with practical tools to help focus your lessons and improve student learning. All you need is an open mind, a writing journal, and a classroom in which to test out some new ideas.

Course Objectives/Program Outline

This course is broken into major parts called modules. Each module contains content sections. Within each section, we cover one or more of the outlined learning objectives for the module. At the end of each module, there is a quiz. Some modules include a project. The breakdown for modules within this course is as follows:

Module One - Introduction to Effective Teaching Methods

Learning Objectives:

  • Explore various methods of effective teaching, as well as reflect upon personal teaching style.
  • Identify ways to begin the school year in an enriching way and discover how to bring these ideas into your classroom.
  • Plan lessons in an effective, organized manner, such as the proper development of course materials, while reflecting upon prior lessons in order to improve and strengthen them.

Project 1: Learning from Past Experiences
Quiz: Multiple-choice questions that pertain to objectives above.

Module Two- Techniques and Lecture Strategies

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify ways to create an engaging discussion in the classroom setting.
  • Discover ways to encourage student participation by promoting critical thinking skills.
  • Identify ways to teach the large lecture course while allowing for student participation as well.

Project 2: Peer Observation
Quiz: Multiple-choice questions that pertain to objectives above.

Module Three- What is Cooperative Learning?

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify the criteria for effective cooperative learning activities.
  • Understand the step-by-step process of designing group work and the ability to become a facilitator in the transfer of knowledge.
  • Identify and describe the different roles students play in small, collaborative groups.
  • Explore different types of group work activities to use in the classroom.

Project 3: The Classroom Experience
Project 4: Learning Activities
Quiz: Multiple-choice questions that pertain to objectives above.

Final Exam:

Multiple choice questions taken from each module.

Final Learning Statement

Learning statements should be in a narrative format – as opposed to an outline format. Depending on individual writing styles Learning statements should be 2-3 pages. The learning statement can vary according to individual style. Your learning statement should answer the broad question of "what did you learn?". To help get you thinking, here are some suggested questions:

  • What are the major concepts of the course that you have learned?
  • What new professional language have you acquired relating to the topic?
  • What teaching techniques for implementing new strategies in the classroom did you come away with?
  • Thinking back to your project reflections, were you surprised at the outcomes?
  • What new resources did you find in the study of the content?
  • As an educator, what new concepts will you now integrate into your teaching?
  • Are there any ideas that presented themselves as enlightening and useful?

--- Sample Course Project ---

Groupwork Projects - Project #3 Overview

Use the information that you have gathered from section two regarding designing groupwork to help you frame your own groupwork project. In the end, you will have designed a unique groupwork project that you can try out in your classroom. See what happens! You may even want to videotape it to see how to further improve the lesson the next time.

Remember that it may not go perfectly the first time, but if you reflect on what happened (good and bad) then the groupwork is bound to improve!

For Your Project Reflection Submission

Take some time to share the dynamics of the groupwork. Describe in detail what happened, and how you felt about the experience. You may use the following questions to guide your thoughts.

  • How did your groups interact with each other?
  • What were the successes? Failures?
  • What are some areas of improvement?

Submit your reflection for this project by clicking on the "Submit Reflection" link in the Module Projects tile located in the Course Dashboard for this course.


Humboldt State University Credit Specifics

  • Academic Credit at the Graduate Level through Humboldt State University (HSU) is offered after successful completion of this course.
  • The 700 series semester credit is post-baccalaureate level appropriate for credentialed teachers which do not require admission to a graduate program.
  • 700-level classes are graduate level classes meant specifically for credential purposes, and are appropriate for license renewal or recertification.
  • Courses are letter graded on official transcripts from HSU.
  • HSU is the northernmost and westernmost institution in the 23-campus California State University (CSU) system.
  • HSU is accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges Senior College and University Commission (WSCUC), a regional accrediting agency serving a diverse membership of public and private higher education institutions.

Summer Option

If you are not currently teaching (ie. Summer break, you are a substitute teacher, etc.), each class offers you the ability to complete coursework independent of a classroom assignment.